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Socialism: Are We There Yet?

Tuesday, October 14, 2008 3 comments

I was talking to someone about economic policy when they kept repeating that we (conservatives) need to emphasize Obama's economic plan and how it compares to socialism. After hearing his rant about socialism, I said "I think people get it and are choosing socialism."

Obama and his campaign are not hiding their economic plan. Obama has said repeatedly that he wants to "share the wealth" and says that it is "fair." Furthermore, his VP nominee has said it is "patriotic" to pay higher taxes. Many Democrats have a socialist economic plan, but also seem to be more covert about it.

After this recent bailout, I wonder if we have already abandoned are capitalistic ideals.

A few questions:

- Has America changed its view on socialism?
- How close is America from becoming socialist?
- Does socialism just sound nice during economic hardship?

3 comments: to “ Socialism: Are We There Yet? so far...

  • MikeT October 15, 2008 at 8:32 AM
     

    Well, this is a simple fact. We're starting to see our country taking the first bold steps toward becoming like Argentina. Most Americans don't realize that in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Argentina was as rich, if not richer, than we were. They were one of the 8 richest countries on Earth back then, but they screwed it up during the rise of Socialism and Fascism by adopting those economic policies and never looking back.

    Honestly, I'm at the point where I want to make money and then pull out of the game. I don't owe this country a damn thing. I don't owe its people a damn thing. I don't say these things as someone who hates his country, but rather like a jilted husband who looks at his wife who he's faithfully supported, still kinda loves, and says "woman, I've given to you, not taken from you, and that means I don't owe you a damn thing."

  • Triton October 16, 2008 at 3:12 AM
     

    Has America changed its view on socialism?

    Not really. Long stretches of the 20th century were far more socialist than the present situation. The FDR and Carter years come to mind. I think the top tax rate in the 1970's was around 70% or so, which would be twice what it is now.

    Americans talk about freedom a lot, but for the most part, they don't really mean it, and haven't meant it in a very long time.

    How close is America from becoming socialist?

    I think "fascist" would be a better description. Outright government ownership of companies is pretty rare, even in the wake of the recent bank acquisitions. But every facet of life is taxed or regulated by the feds; they don't have to own companies in order to boss them around.

    Does socialism just sound nice during economic hardship?

    Everybody wants something for nothing. Universal suffrage gives them the means to get it.

    Honestly, I'm at the point where I want to make money and then pull out of the game.

    Absolutely. If I was independently wealthy and could afford to live anywhere in the world, it would not be here.

    I don't owe this country a damn thing. I don't owe its people a damn thing.

    Again, I couldn't agree more. Our ancestors obviously felt the same way, or else we'd have been born and raised in the U.K.

    Too bad there's not another New World out there just waiting to be colonized by folks who want to be left alone.

  • Geppy October 18, 2008 at 11:45 PM
     

    According to the definition below (#3), the US has been a socialist state for quite a while I think. This "bailout" is a fulfillment of #1. I don't know that we'll see #2.

    Main Entry: so·cial·ism
    Pronunciation: \ˈsō-shə-ˌli-zəm\
    Function: noun
    Date: 1837
    1: any of various economic and political theories advocating collective or governmental ownership and administration of the means of production and distribution of goods
    2 a: a system of society or group living in which there is no private property b: a system or condition of society in which the means of production are owned and controlled by the state
    3: a stage of society in Marxist theory transitional between capitalism and communism and distinguished by unequal distribution of goods and pay according to work done

 
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